According to a recent study, Smartphone users check their phones every 6.5 minutes. That astounded me.

It means most phone users, not just a few annoying people, are checking their phones as they talk with people, as they eat, as they do most activities.

That means most  aren’t concentrating on something longer than 6.5 minutes before they need to relieve their boredom by checking their phone.

If that is the average, how much are the power users checking their phones?

Should we be concerned if we can’t go through a meal or a conversation plugging back into our technology?

After reading those stats, I am going to be more aware of how much I am checking my phone. How about you?

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8 comments

  • Teri

    I HATE smartphones. And I avoid smartphone addicts, to the point that I have started ending (and not starting new) friendships with people who are addicted. Why should I give someone my time… when they don’t give me theirs? I mourn the loss of having a continuous conversation and seeing someone’s eyes as we talk.

  • Teri

    I HATE smartphones. And I avoid smartphone addicts, to the point that I have started ending (and not starting new) friendships with people who are addicted. Why should I give someone my time… when they don’t give me theirs? I mourn the loss of having a continuous conversation and seeing someone’s eyes as we talk.

  • Teri

    I HATE smartphones. And I avoid smartphone addicts, to the point that I have started ending (and not starting new) friendships with people who are addicted. Why should I give someone my time… when they don’t give me theirs? I mourn the loss of having a continuous conversation and seeing someone’s eyes as we talk.

  • Teri

    I HATE smartphones. And I avoid smartphone addicts, to the point that I have started ending (and not starting new) friendships with people who are addicted. Why should I give someone my time… when they don’t give me theirs? I mourn the loss of having a continuous conversation and seeing someone’s eyes as we talk.

  • Carla

    Sounds about right to me… we don’t have a “smart phone”, well we do, but we only pay for the phone coverage, no browsing data, etc… so thankfully I can honestly say that I do NO belong in this category! I’d never get anything done! lol!! But one of my friends definitely fits into this category and it drives me crazy when we’re together and she’s forever texting this person and that person.

  • Jan

    My smartphone/computer is attached to me almost every waking moment. I am reticent to admit my addiction with the posted comments stating such negative views of users/addicts. I am a “need to know” kind of person and have found myself often Googling for information about this or that throughout my day. Facebook and Pinterest take a fair portion of my day especially when I’m not teaching. My addiction, to some degree, is escapism. Life hasn’t been so easy for several years, and during my pre-iPhone days, I often isolated for hours in a dark corner with my desktop computer. I suppose the fact that I’ve escaped that dismal spot is a positive step forward in my own mental health, or is it negative because now I’m constantly carrying that habit around with me?

  • Beth Dargis

    HI Jan, Some people like to be connected all the time, afraid they will miss something. Each personality is different. I never say you have to have phone free places because that is really hard for some people. I think it’s fine as long as you are conversing with the people around you and not lost in the phone.

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